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Author Topic: Encryption for use on an iBook  (Read 8674 times)

Bill St. Clair

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Encryption for use on an iBook
« Reply #60 on: July 31, 2005, 09:20:49 am »

I installed everything on my wife's PowerBook and was able to reproduce Kirsten's problem. If I send mail to somebody whose public key I do not have, PGPMail refuses to encrypt the message.

Quick question, Kirsten? Of what use is it to send an encryped message to somebody whose key you do not have? If it isn't encrypted to their key, they will not be able to read it.
 
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"The state can only survive as long as a majority is programmed to believe that theft isn't wrong if it's called taxation or asset forfeiture or eminent domain, that assault and kidnapping isn't wrong if it's called arrest, that mass murder isn't wrong if it's called war." -- Bill St. Clair

"Separation of Earth and state!" -- Bill St. Clair

Kirsten

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Encryption for use on an iBook
« Reply #61 on: July 31, 2005, 11:37:40 pm »

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« Last Edit: February 23, 2007, 01:22:45 pm by Kirsten »
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Bill St. Clair

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Encryption for use on an iBook
« Reply #62 on: August 01, 2005, 05:51:18 am »

After I hit send, I thought of that, but decided to wait for you to answer. Looks like you're stuck with GPGDropThing for that one. I haven't tried it, but I'd wager that you'll be able to sign and encrypt a message to anybody whose key you have, now that you've quit and restarted GPGDropThing. Note that for signing you choose YOUR key and for encrypting you choose your key and the recipients' keys (unless you don't want to be able to read your own message later, in which case you can leave your key off). GPGDropThing is sadly missing a "Sign and Encrypt" function.

Alternatively, you could convince your friend to put the real email address in his/her key, and send the key only to people who already know that address. He/She could even keep two keys, one for public posting, which could be used to PM messages on public internet boards, and one for private correspondents who know the real email address.

Personally, I think that GPGMail's dialog that warns about sending to an email address for which you don't have a key should have another option, "Ignore" or "Trust Me". You could write them and ask for that. They might agree with you and change it.
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"The state can only survive as long as a majority is programmed to believe that theft isn't wrong if it's called taxation or asset forfeiture or eminent domain, that assault and kidnapping isn't wrong if it's called arrest, that mass murder isn't wrong if it's called war." -- Bill St. Clair

"Separation of Earth and state!" -- Bill St. Clair

Kirsten

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Encryption for use on an iBook
« Reply #63 on: August 02, 2005, 01:04:24 pm »

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« Last Edit: February 23, 2007, 01:21:54 pm by Kirsten »
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Kirsten

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Re: Encryption for use on an iBook
« Reply #64 on: April 29, 2006, 10:37:53 pm »

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« Last Edit: February 23, 2007, 01:22:15 pm by Kirsten »
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linuxfan

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Re: Encryption for use on an iBook
« Reply #65 on: April 30, 2006, 02:58:18 pm »

(and I use Gmail, for which I haven't seen any encryption integration).

Thunderbird with Enigmail, and Thunderbird can be set up to use gmail, as well, FYI
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linuxfan

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Re: Encryption for use on an iBook
« Reply #66 on: April 30, 2006, 03:10:15 pm »

I am getting very confused as to what I am doing and where I am going.

So first I looked at this:

Quote
How to Set Up Encrypted Mail on Mac OS X

at http://www.macdevcenter.com/pub/a/mac/2003...01/20/mail.html

But I never figured out how to get keys without getting a certificate which I'd rather not have since it involves giving out personal information and I don't expect I'll need it for my casual e-mail purposes.

So then I looked at GPGMail, but that said it doesn't work for Mac OS X.

That left me with GPG and PGP.  PGP 9.0 looks like it costs about $70 after the free trial peroid with the new-user discount which I'm not really interested in shelling out right now.

So now I'm trying to get set up with Mac GPG.  I've downloaded GPG 1.4.1 for Mac OS X 10.3 which is supposed to also be compatible with 10.4.  I verified it using the provided MD5 checksum.  Now I'm wading through documentation trying to figure out which documentation is actually going to help me set this up instead of trying to convince me that encryption is great and I'm an idiot for not using it.  I do not understand why this isn't all laid out very simply in one place in some logical organized format.  I am about ready to take my fork and start poking my eyeballs with it I'm so frustrated.  Is it this difficult for everyone, or is there just something wrong with me?

Kirsten, i don't know how it works on Mac, but on linux it's a real simple textbased answer questions setup for GPG, started with the command gpg
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