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Author Topic: France in civil war  (Read 1786 times)

Elias Alias

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2019, 04:56:03 pm »

I find it to be remarkable that in spite of all the woes perpetrated by government upon the people, most people still feel that they want a government. Their concern is merely which kind of government, and how they can control a government once it is created and put into power.

When I was a young kid, we children had a game which we played occasionally. It was called "Follow The Leader". I've no idea if kids are still taught to play that game, but it was very common back in the 1950s.

The psychological damage to the human spirit which such a game caused amazes me today as an old man.
Leader? Does everyone want a damned "Leader"? What ever happened to the idea of a man or woman being their own Leader? Who, when one really thinks it through, would want to be a "Follower"? Is being a follower the best that one can be? And what about those in our midst who want to be the "Leader"? What obvious flaw can we observe in such a person, eh?

Salute!
Elias Alias
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slidemansailor

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2019, 10:29:27 pm »

Dang Elias, the first childhood game that jumped into my head was "dodge ball".  Kind-of the opposite of "follow the leader".
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Elias Alias

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2019, 10:40:58 pm »

Dang Elias, the first childhood game that jumped into my head was "dodge ball".  Kind-of the opposite of "follow the leader".

I'm afraid I don't remember ever playing "dodge ball".  Unless someone explains that one to me, I'll just have to guess at what you mean. But say, was that game underwritten by a touch of aggression, like, as in, someone throwing a hard ball at you which you had to dodge or get bruised?

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mouse

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2019, 05:39:17 am »

Elias you must remember playing "bulrush", it's just about the only playground game I remember from my childhood.  I remember one teacher making derogatory comments about it all the time and calling it "a game to make you kids think like little warriors".  At that time there was an accelerated teacher training programme for soldiers who had come home from WWII in an effort to get them into jobs, and a lot of our teachers were hangovers from that.

When I think about it, just about all organised kids' games are mimicking soldiers on a battlefield, "dodgeball", "follow the leader", "tag", "bulrush" (well I guess tag and bulrush are pretty much the same, but with "bulrush" we even used to rush out of a "trench" or down a hill.

I can't really think of any childhood game that DOES promote individuality and freedom.
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Elias Alias

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2019, 06:51:45 am »

Elias you must remember playing "bulrush", it's just about the only playground game I remember from my childhood.  I remember one teacher making derogatory comments about it all the time and calling it "a game to make you kids think like little warriors".  At that time there was an accelerated teacher training programme for soldiers who had come home from WWII in an effort to get them into jobs, and a lot of our teachers were hangovers from that.

When I think about it, just about all organised kids' games are mimicking soldiers on a battlefield, "dodgeball", "follow the leader", "tag", "bulrush" (well I guess tag and bulrush are pretty much the same, but with "bulrush" we even used to rush out of a "trench" or down a hill.

I can't really think of any childhood game that DOES promote individuality and freedom.

Well, mouse, we're making a case for Home Schooling, yes?  Collectivism is the antithesis of individuality, as G. Edward Griffin says.  Parents who were trained in games when they were children seldom question the problem inherent with such games as they indoctrinate their own kids into the same games. 

Salute!
Elias
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Bill St. Clair

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2019, 09:50:20 am »

I'm afraid I don't remember ever playing "dodge ball".  Unless someone explains that one to me, I'll just have to guess at what you mean. But say, was that game underwritten by a touch of aggression, like, as in, someone throwing a hard ball at you which you had to dodge or get bruised?

Everybody except the one who's "it" lines up, and gets a flexible air-filled rubber ball, a little less than 12" in diameter, thrown at them. The last one to get hit becomes "it" and throws the ball. The ball was soft enough that permanent injury was unlikely, but if thrown hard, it could hurt.
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Elias Alias

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2019, 06:35:38 pm »

Ouch!
There is much about human nature within herd mentality, customs, mores, and societal inter-relations in cultural anthropology.

There is a dog who lives at a place where I buy things at times. It's an "outdoor" kind of supply place. The dog keeps sticks handy, and when any customer drives up, he quickly brings a stick and drops it at the customer's feet, in hopes the customer will pick it up and pitch it so he can "go fetch!".  I usually have to throw the danged stick four or five times before I can go inside to see the clerk. Animals play games, people play games. I guess it's good to be alive on planet earth, sometimes. ;)
Salute!
Elias
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jamie

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2019, 09:39:49 pm »

Elias you must remember playing "bulrush", it's just about the only playground game I remember from my childhood.  I remember one teacher making derogatory comments about it all the time and calling it "a game to make you kids think like little warriors".  At that time there was an accelerated teacher training programme for soldiers who had come home from WWII in an effort to get them into jobs, and a lot of our teachers were hangovers from that.

When I think about it, just about all organised kids' games are mimicking soldiers on a battlefield, "dodgeball", "follow the leader", "tag", "bulrush" (well I guess tag and bulrush are pretty much the same, but with "bulrush" we even used to rush out of a "trench" or down a hill.

I can't really think of any childhood game that DOES promote individuality and freedom.

some games promote toughness, agility, strength, some promote mental acuity, so it isn't all bad. team work isn't bad in most contexts. Some sports like boxing and gymnastics, tennis etc are individual and that isn't bad at all.

If kids and adults do nothing they will end up weak. Or never be anything but weak. How is that good?

And you and everyone else on this board may be perfectly safe right now but that may not always be the case, either for you or the people who come after you.

« Last Edit: January 17, 2019, 09:41:38 pm by jamie »
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jamie

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2019, 09:44:56 pm »

I'm afraid I don't remember ever playing "dodge ball".  Unless someone explains that one to me, I'll just have to guess at what you mean. But say, was that game underwritten by a touch of aggression, like, as in, someone throwing a hard ball at you which you had to dodge or get bruised?

Everybody except the one who's "it" lines up, and gets a flexible air-filled rubber ball, a little less than 12" in diameter, thrown at them. The last one to get hit becomes "it" and throws the ball. The ball was soft enough that permanent injury was unlikely, but if thrown hard, it could hurt.

It was a team sport as I remember.  equally divided sides, throw the ball at someone on the other side, if someone gets hit on the opposing team they are out of play.  the winner is the team with people still in the game.
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slidemansailor

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2019, 12:31:48 pm »

I recall dodge ball in the same form as Jamie does.

In high school we had four classes of 30-40 per period. The burn-off-steam game of choice on rainy days was a version of that called "Killer Ball".  One class at each end of the indoor basketball court would throw slightly under-inflated volleyballs at the other two classes who were on the court. One hit and you moved off the floor to the wall. I don't know why, but often found myself alone or in very small company on the court at the end of the game... playing Bonnie & Clyde to the federal ambush when the opforces would launch an un-dodgable mass fusillade. Earning that position was for me more victory than hurt.

Those are the guys who fight to the last man. Much like the Confederates would have done if they had any idea how awful the Union would turn out to be.
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mouse

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2019, 06:10:35 pm »

Sounds like all these games (apart from "follow the leader" of course) are really "prepare for war" games.  "Dodge ball", ""bullrush", "killerball", they're all pretty much the same.

My youngest grandson has just turned 7 and he has "perfected" (his words) a game that he has taught to his cousins, his brother and any neighbourhood kid who'll listen.  He calls it "patrolling the perimeter".  I got the boys "army suits" for Christmas (camouflage material pants, jacket, teeshirt and cap), they also have olive green "jungle hats" that I got off an on-line site.  They dress up in "army gear" (you can even get "camouflage colour boots) and organise anyone playing into "teams" (if there is only two of them playing, there is 2 teams of one) whereby they hide behind trees, bushes and fences and at the same time try to "ambush" members of the other team (or any stray dogs or cats that happen by).  When they get tired of the game (or it is dinner time) the team with the most "kills" (his words) is the winner.

This came with absolutely no influence from me (apart from me buying all the "army" gear and guns, that is).  It is all down to "youtube".

Just another version of "dodgeball" or "killerball" or plain old "tag".

I guess all kids have to train for when their country is "taken over by hostiles" (another quote from my grandson - now if that is not pure youtube I don't know what is).
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mouse

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2019, 07:51:20 pm »

Hmm, week 11 of the "yellow vest" movement and Macron not only refuses to leave but he is now claiming that he's "one of you", and yet just a short time ago he was comparing himself to a god.

https://www.rt.com/news/449822-president-macron-heir-comment/

As France braced for the 11th week of the Yellow Vest protests, President Emmanuel Macron said that he is not a 'man of the elite' as his critics claim. Yet, people told RT he can’t relate to the struggles of ordinary citizens.
In an apparent effort to brush aside the label ‘president of the rich’, President Macron decided to reaffirm that he is a ‘man of the people’.
“I’m not an heir,” the president said on Thursday.

snip
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jamie

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2019, 08:08:53 pm »

Sounds like all these games (apart from "follow the leader" of course) are really "prepare for war" games.  "Dodge ball", ""bullrush", "killerball", they're all pretty much the same.

My youngest grandson has just turned 7 and he has "perfected" (his words) a game that he has taught to his cousins, his brother and any neighbourhood kid who'll listen.  He calls it "patrolling the perimeter".  I got the boys "army suits" for Christmas (camouflage material pants, jacket, teeshirt and cap), they also have olive green "jungle hats" that I got off an on-line site.  They dress up in "army gear" (you can even get "camouflage colour boots) and organise anyone playing into "teams" (if there is only two of them playing, there is 2 teams of one) whereby they hide behind trees, bushes and fences and at the same time try to "ambush" members of the other team (or any stray dogs or cats that happen by).  When they get tired of the game (or it is dinner time) the team with the most "kills" (his words) is the winner.

This came with absolutely no influence from me (apart from me buying all the "army" gear and guns, that is).  It is all down to "youtube".

Just another version of "dodgeball" or "killerball" or plain old "tag".

I guess all kids have to train for when their country is "taken over by hostiles" (another quote from my grandson - now if that is not pure youtube I don't know what is).

That sounds like a fun game. Made me laugh too since your seven year old grandson has "perfected" the game.
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jamie

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #28 on: January 26, 2019, 10:46:34 pm »

update on what is going on in France for anyone interested.  by the amazing Polly mentioned by Elias Alias. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kd3HeluJ9_8

UPDATED NUMBERS: ~ 6000 arrested, ~ 300 still in jail, more than 1800 people injured including 104 severely wounded ( lost an eye, a hand, a foot, a testicle, turn deaf, etc...), -2 are the coma, -13 dead. In this video I go over the information provided to me by a source in France who is involved with the Gil-ts jaunes / Yell0w V-st protests. ........ I take you through the main points - characters, events, government response, police statements & developments both good and bad. Also, I offer caution after reading a news release from DAVOS which I believe shows that the would-be rulers of the world are ready to grab the ultimate power.

the first three minutes is interesting, apparently this is a rarity, a leaderless revolution. The police have arrested 5 thousand people in an attempt to find a leader.  There is sort of a spokesman but according to the French source, there is no leader because they learned their lesson, a leader is too easily bought off, compromised or otherwise negated.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2019, 10:58:23 pm by jamie »
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mouse

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Re: France in civil war
« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2019, 06:35:54 am »

Excellent video.  Well worth spending time to watch.

However, I'm wondering about a couple of things:

First, Polly's source seemed to be quite adamant that the French police never used "live" ammunition against the yellow vest protestors, but this news that I posted about two weeks ago said otherwise.  Am I missing something?  Or just plain stupid?

https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2019/01/15/french-police-caught-brandishing-live-firearms-yellow-vest-protest/

Also, the part in the video where it had a spokesman talking about police suicides and how no deaths or injuries were their fault as they didn't get to see the "big picture", and he concluded that they were upset at what they were "MADE to do".

Well, I'm gonna be really harsh and say that I have found that that is a "child thing", a child will often do something annoying and then claim "he MADE me do it" (indicating another child).  I have tried to impress upon them "nobody can ever MAKE you do anything".

I like her comment about "laws" and "rules".  I guess I don't have to reiterate that there are only a few actual "laws" and the rest are "rules".  Of course workplaces and families can make "rules" - for themselves of course - but no one (particularly governments) can make "laws".
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