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Author Topic: This is Waaayyyy Cool!  (Read 10515 times)

Roy J. Tellason

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This is Waaayyyy Cool!
« Reply #60 on: January 19, 2005, 11:41:31 pm »

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This is because around that time my oldest son brought home a floppy from one of his friends that had an annoying little virus on it. I think it was the melissa virus(?). Anyway, it didn't really do any damage, just robbed me of resources.

I wish the hell that some of the folks that were sending them damn things to me in emails would deal with the issue...!

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At that point I thought it would be great to have a way to protect the most fundamental bits of software in a system. When I read about the Linux root idea it really got me to thinking.

Linux (and unix and related stuff) is a whole different approach to things than windoze,  which grew out of dos and which is *still* a single-user system as far as I'm concerned.  It was designed from the ground up to be a multi-user system.

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When I setup SimplyMEPIS I established the root name and used a big honkin' password with lots of different characters and numbers. Not foolproof but, enough to discourage all but the most dedicated crackers.

Long as you can remember it.  :-)

There's other stuff you can do,  too,  if it hasn't already been done for you -- I've seen security issues become more important in the few years I've been running linux,  and a lot of the defaults these days are fairly sensible.  Stuff like not allowing root logins from a remote location,  just from the local console,  and similar stuff.  It's a whole big issue that has books on just that subject,  so I'm not gonna dive too deep into it here.

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When I get around to sorting out what is necessary and what ain't in SimplyMEPIS I'll also be reviewing permissions and making changes I think are necessary.

Permissions can be tricky sometimes,  watch out for that -- you may end up doing something that may require you to go back and "fix" what you did.  Not a big deal,  but it's probably a good thing to consider the implications of messing with stuff.

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There's a lot of excess in this distribution. 4 sound modules, at least 4 text editors, I don't know how many consoles there are. Just bunches of applets. Lots and lots of redundancy. I'm going to have quite a learning curve here.

I thought when I first started messing with linux that it was damn near vertical,  and I'm a fairly technical person.  But you'll get the hang of it.

Text editors are a personal choice,  some people like one thing,  some people like another,  and I guess it depends to some extent what you started with.  I don't even know how many there are on this stuff I've got here,  probably vi or one of its clones,  a few others for command-line,  I *think* I stopped it from installing emacs <g>,  and then under KDE there are at least a half dozen or so,  Kwrite, Kword,  and some others I can't recall.  The menus don't reflect reality here,  but that's not a big deal either.  Me,  I mostly use the editor that comes with mc,  because I do most of my editing on a textmode console,  not in a GUI window.  But that's just me.  Everybody else is gonna make their own choice,  and use what they like.

And if you decide to get in there and "lean things out" a bit by removing stuff,  what I'd advise is that instead of deleting things (ain't no easy undelete!),  move them to some other place and then leave it there a while,  see if anything breaks. There's a surprising lot of interdependence between some of the bits that make these systems up sometimes.
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Alton Speers

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« Reply #61 on: January 20, 2005, 06:28:02 am »

Before I get into making alterations and such I need to learn the in and outs of some of these Linux apps, get a good firewall, transfer important files and review hardware/upgrade priorities and then get those up and operational. Now that Gulchnet1 is coming to life I think I would like to get on board with it. This means I need to concentrate on getting up to speed on some of this networking stuff as well as using Linux. I think I'm going to nose around Amazon.com for a book or two that will help in that direction.

Alton
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ZooT_aLLures

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« Reply #62 on: January 20, 2005, 10:47:47 am »

Alton,

Linux itself can be setup to provide a fairly good firewall*grin*
As you get used to it and start nosing around the /etc directory (or the graphical service configuration tools) you'll find places where you can simply turn off services and other places where you can close the ports associated with those services.....
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Even some cowboy and indian outlaws in the 1800's eventually stopped sleeping under buffalo skins, and came to town to entertain paying customers. For some I imagine the bruising of their ego never healed.

We all have some scar tissue that never lets us completely forget the intent of the adventure.

Roy J. Tellason

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« Reply #63 on: January 20, 2005, 03:35:13 pm »

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Linux itself can be setup to provide a fairly good firewall*grin*

Yes indeed!  I keep getting assorted *.pif and *.scr and *.exe and stuff like that inside of *.zip files, and don't have to worry about most of it...

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As you get used to it and start nosing around the /etc directory (or the graphical service configuration tools) you'll find places where you can simply turn off services and other places where you can close the ports associated with those services.....

Mostly,  these days,  stuff seems to come with most of the services closed by default,  as compared to the way it used to be.  I guess the folks making the distros are getting somewhat more security-conscious.
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Member of the toughest, meanest, deadliest, most unrelenting -- and ablest -- form of life in this section of space,  a critter that can be killed but can't be tamed.  --Robert A. Heinlein, "The Puppet Masters"
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heatherj

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This is Waaayyyy Cool!
« Reply #64 on: January 20, 2005, 09:46:47 pm »

I've been using SUSe, in various versions, for the last 5 years.  I'm currently using 9.1 Pro (till cheap versions of 9.2 Pro hit ebay).  To get out of the evil, addictive, game known as Frozen Bubbles, simply hit the Escape key.  I had about 70 Konqueror windows up this morning (I was looking at some pictures), along with a couple of other apps, with no problem.  This is on a 1.8G Celeron, with 500MB of RAM.  Oh, and yes, KMail and Konqueror do have automatic spell-checkers, although I find lots of words they don't know.
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enemyofthestate

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« Reply #65 on: January 21, 2005, 12:18:49 am »

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Linux itself can be setup to provide a fairly good firewall*grin*
Actually, Linux can set up damned good industrial quality firewall.  I use it at the LA office to manage two ISP connections. a 'trusted' network, and two DMZ's.  I have another linux based firewall in Phoenix that has the usual Net, Trusted, and DMZ arrangement.  The two firewalls use OpenVPN in peer mode to provide an encrypted tunnel between the sites.  It is not as easy to set up as Checkpoint but it cost me about 1/4 as much as upgrading the two checkpoints would and I don't have to deal with Checkpoint's World Renown [sarcasm drip on] Service. [sarcasm drip off]
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Atheist   n.   A person to be pitied in that he is unable to believe things for which there is no evidence, and who has thus deprived himself of a convenient means of feeling superior to others
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