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Author Topic: Ham Radio Training Thread  (Read 10049 times)

oldzoot

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Question T1D02
« Reply #45 on: November 01, 2007, 10:22:45 pm »

T1D02 [A] [97.5(b)(1)]

Who can become an amateur licensee in the US?

A. Anyone except a representative of a foreign government


B. Only a citizen of the United States

C. Anyone except an employee of the US government

D. Anyone
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Question T1D03
« Reply #46 on: November 01, 2007, 10:24:17 pm »

T1D03 [D] [97.5(b)(1)]

What is the minimum age required to hold an amateur license?

A. 14 years or older

B. 18 years or older

C. 70 years or younger

D. There is no minimum age requirement
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oldzoot

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Question T1D04
« Reply #47 on: November 01, 2007, 10:25:09 pm »

T1D04 [D] [97.5(a)]

What government agency grants your amateur radio license?

A. The Department of Defense

B. The Bureau of Public Communications

C. The Department of Commerce

D. The Federal Communications Commission
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oldzoot

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Question T1B01
« Reply #48 on: November 06, 2007, 12:08:18 am »

T1B01 [C] [97.3(a)(28)]

What is the ITU?

A. The International Telecommunications Utility

B. The International Telephone Union

C. The International Telecommunication Union

D. The International Technology Union
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Question T1B02
« Reply #49 on: November 06, 2007, 12:11:04 am »

T1B02 [A] [97.301]     

What is the purpose of ITU Regions?

A. They are used to assist in the management of frequency allocations

B. They are useful when operating maritime mobile

C. They are used in call sign assignments

D. They must be used after your call sign to indicate your location

The ITU regions are used to ensure that frequency allocations for neighbor countries (which are close enough to interfere with each other) are compatible and minimize interference.
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oldzoot

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Question T1C03
« Reply #50 on: November 06, 2007, 12:12:36 am »

T1C03 B  [97.111]

Under what conditions are amateur stations allowed to communicate with stations operating in other radio services?

A. When other radio services make contact with amateur stations [nope.  Other radio services would be like police or taxis.  Hams are not allowed to talk to them normally.  The FCC could make an exception in some strange emergency]

B. When authorized by the FCC

C. When communicating with stations in the Family Radio Service  [This will probably never be allowed]

D. When commercial broadcast stations are off the air  [this is just random]
« Last Edit: November 06, 2007, 12:16:22 am by oldzoot »
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Question T1C04
« Reply #51 on: November 06, 2007, 12:21:20 am »

T1C04 B [97.301(a)]

Which frequency is within the 6-meter band?

A. 49.00 MHz  [Just below 6 meters]

B. 52.525 MHz

C. 28.50 MHz  [ Nope. Waaay too low. ]

D. 222.15 MHz  [ This is 1 1/4 meters ]

This question seems to portend a nasty amount of memorization of the frequency bands.  Don't sweat it!  There are only a couple of questions in the pool about specific numbers.   This is one of them.   Memorize that 6Meters is 50-54 MC (just under TV channel 2 which starts at 54mc)  and you will be okay.   
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Question T1C05
« Reply #52 on: November 06, 2007, 12:23:50 am »

T1C05 A [97.301(a)]

Which amateur band are you using when transmitting on 146.52 MHz?

A. 2 meter band

B. 20 meter band

C. 14 meter band

D. 6 meter band

Yup.  More memorization.   We got 4 or 5 of these.    REMEMBERIZE   144-148 mc  == 2 Meters !
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Question T1C06
« Reply #53 on: November 06, 2007, 12:34:47 am »

T1C06 C [97.301(a)]

Which 70-centimeter frequency is authorized to a Technician class license holder operating in ITU Region 2?

A. 455.350 MHz   [this is outside the 420-450 Mc 70 cm band!]

B. 146.520 MHz   [ this is 2 meters, remember ?]

C. 443.350 MHz
   [yowza!!! inside the band! ]

D. 222.520 MHz  [ this is   1 1/4 meters   not 70 CM ]

The VHF/UHF bands are:

144   -   148           222   - 225               420   -    450              902   -   928            1240    -   1300
  2  Meters            1 1/4 Meters                 70  CM                        33  CM                        23  CM

The other sneaky part is the mention of ITU region 2.   Thats the US.
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Question T1C07
« Reply #54 on: November 06, 2007, 12:41:51 am »

T1C07 B [97.301(a)]

Which 23 centimeter frequency is authorized to a Technician class license holder operating in ITU Region 2?

A. 2315 MHz  [this is not 23 cm.  maybe like 10 cm or something]

B. 1296 MHz   [ummm  I hate to say, but the tech band is 1270 to 1295.  but they say this is the answer.]

C. 3390 MHz  [ this is even less than 10 cm! ]

D. 146.52 MHz  [this is  2 meters]


I think this question and answer are wrong.    B is the closest answer,  it is the only one in the 23 cm band,  but technicians do not have priviliges on the whole band.   This is probably in a test erratta somewhere.     
OZ
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Question T1C08
« Reply #55 on: November 06, 2007, 12:44:48 am »

T1C08 D [97.301(a)]

What amateur band are you using if you are operating on 223.50 MHz?

A. 15 meter band   [ 15 M  is  21Mhz ]

B. 10 meter band    [ 10 M  is 28 Mhz ]

C. 2 meter band      [ 2 M  is 144 Mhz ]

D. 1.25 meter band


I think that is the last frequency question.    :laugh:

OZ
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T1B03
« Reply #56 on: December 17, 2007, 11:14:06 pm »

T1B03 [C] [97.17(d)]

What system does the FCC use to select new amateur radio call signs?

A. Call signs are assigned in random order

B. The applicant is allowed to pick a call sign

C. Call signs are assigned in sequential order

D. Volunteer Examiners choose an unassigned call sign
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T1B04
« Reply #57 on: December 17, 2007, 11:17:27 pm »

T1B04 [A] [97.19(d)]

What FCC call sign program might you use to obtain a call sign containing your initials?

A. The vanity call sign program


B. The sequential call sign program   [ It could happen I suppose, but pretty durn unlikely! ]

C. The special event call sign program [ I don't think they do initials - more like abreviations ]

D. There is no FCC provision for choosing a your call sign  [ There is, as in A - the vanity callsign program.  Most of the good ones are already taken though ]
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T1B05
« Reply #58 on: December 17, 2007, 11:18:38 pm »

T1B05 B [97.17(b)(2)]

How might an amateur radio club obtain a club station call sign?

A. By applying directly to the FCC in Gettysburg, PA

B. By applying through a Club Station Call Sign Administrator


C. By submitting a FCC Form 605 to the FCC in Washington, DC

D. By notifying a VE team using NCVEC Form 605
« Last Edit: December 17, 2007, 11:28:40 pm by oldzoot »
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T0B03
« Reply #59 on: December 17, 2007, 11:32:44 pm »

T0B03 (D)

What should you do before you climb a tower?

A. Arrange for a helper or observer

B. Inspect the tower for damage or loose hardware

C. Make sure there are no electrical storms nearby

D. All of these answers are correct


Think safety!   If you are up on a tower (secured with a safety line to a climbing harness)  and pass out,  it sure would be good to have someone on the ground watching out for you!   And I think we would all agree that it would be foolish to climb up a tower with loose or broken pieces parts.  And electrical storms?? that's pretty obvious.    I would hasten to add locking & tagging ( or just plain disabling ) the transmitters -  RF burns are nasty and there may be points in an antenna system where there are thousands of volts of RF energy.
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